Renewal Course Descriptions

Selecting the course title below will reveal a detailed description of each renewal course. Visit the Core Courses page for detailed descriptions of courses needed to obtain CERA status.

To download a pdf version or to view offline a detailed descriptions of courses you may refer to the PEP Manual or the Core Course Description.

Valley Forge
  • Course XIII:     The Policy Process

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    Today more than ever, election officials at all levels of government are becoming involved in the public policy process as new laws and regulations are proposed across the states and in Washington, DC. As election and registration officials, public policy affects what you do and how you do it. This course examines the policy process as a system of change within the American political environment that applies to all public policy decisions. The course looks at how you are affected and can effect various stages in the policy process—getting problems on the agenda, helping lay our rational alternatives to problems, impacting policy decisions and influencing policy adoption.

  • Course XIV:      Crisis Management

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    Crises come in many forms: natural disasters, last-minute changes in election law, failure of a key supplier, allegations of error or misconduct accompanied by media attention and political pressure, etc. This course draws upon the broader literature on risk management, disaster management, and crisis management to set up discussions of mitigation strategies for election administration. It examines the elements contributing to a crisis and effective decision-making processes to emerge out of a crisis situation relatively successfully.

  • Course XV:       Training in Elections

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    Training is critical, not just for poll workers but for everyone in the elections process. This course draws upon recently published material on elections training, best practices, and existing knowledge of adult education to offer principles and examples applicable to election administration. This is a graduate class for the PEP program, and participates will be expected to share their own experiences and actively participate in discussions and projects, to employ training techniques appropriate for the various training situations in the administration of elections and voter registration.

  • Course XVI:      Contracting

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    Election officials acquire many goods and services from private vendors. The largest and most complicated contracts are usually for voting systems equipment and support. Successful procurement is affected by a variety of factors, such as governmental rules, funding decisions, and market conditions. The emphasis in this course is on the role of election officials and the factors that they can control or influence within the overall process.

  • Course XVII:    Comparative Democracy

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    There are many democracies in the world. Most of them do not hold elections in the same manner as the U.S. While people vote in all of them, the authorities that administer elections and the rules and procedures for calling elections, registering voters, voting, counting, and determining winners vary across nations. Alternatives include: national election commissions, state-initiated registration, proportional representation, and the single transferable vote. This course will provide an overview of electoral systems around the world and discuss the implications of different systems for politics and administration where they are used.

  • Course XVIII:  Conflict Management

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    The responsibilities of elections and voter registration officials take place in a high stress environment with demands and pressures from voters, candidate, legislators, media, and other government agencies. Most of those who interact with elections officials know little about the process of administering elections, the deadline pressures, the budget constraints, the staffing problems. Nevertheless, elections officials are expected to be efficient, thorough, fair, open, understanding. In a given election cycle, candidates can err, voters can ignore instructions, the media can present inaccurate information, yet all parties expect election and voter registration administrators to perform flawlessly. This course discusses how to operate in such an environment—where expectations are so high, buck-passing is rampant, and stress is maximized. It will focus on conflict management—how to take the regular crises (and the really big one) of work in elections and handle them with professionalism, tact, and wisdom. The workshop will include a number of exercises to develop skills in active listening, communication, and conflict resolution.

  • Course XIX:     Election Law: Constitutional Issues

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    The right to vote is a fundamental, constitutional guarantee evidencing an inchoate principle of democracy, to wit, an equal opportunity to participate in the making of public law. This course will be concerned with how the laws governing elections further or hinder the attainment of that democratic goal. Special attention will be devoted to the analysis of constitutional requirements and prohibitions applied to federal and state statutes.

  • Course XX:       Federal Impact on Elections and Voter Registration: 1960s to Present

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    A new wave of federal involvement in elections and voter registration is underway, even though elections have historically been administered through local election officials. Behind the scenes, the role of the federal government is shaped by the American system of federalism and particular relationships between the federal government and the states. These relationships organize government in all areas of public policy and will shape the federal role in elections in the future. This course examines the forces that shape federal involvement in election administration and voter registration, with a focus on the federal role from the 1960s to the present. Large scale trends suggest new roles and relationships for elections officials.

  • Course XXI:     The Integrity of Elections

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    The 2000 presidential elections brought unprecedented public scrutiny to the elections process. Close elections had been contested and recounted before, but none were analyzed by more Americans using more sources for their information. In the aftermath of that election, newspapers, television news programs, and Internet bloggers raised questions about not only the elections process itself but also the integrity of those administering the elections. A veritable cottage industry has since emerged which seeks to use film to mold public opinion regarding the fairness of elections and election administrators. Relying upon documentaries, television clips, K-12 educational films, and other sources, participants in the course examine, critique, and learn from the way elections in America are portrayed in film.

  • Course XXII:    Benchmarking

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    Elections and the administration of elections have garnered increasing attention since 2000. Of particular importance to legislators and the citizenry they represent is administrative accountability. One way to ensure this public accountability, while, concomitantly improving organizational efficiency and effectiveness is a process known as “benchmarking.” Hence, this course covers the basics of benchmarking as it relates to elections administration. The course begins with a general overview of the benchmarking process focusing on its general use in the field of public administration. Next, the course covers several appropriate, common benchmarking strategies and methodologies available to elections administrators. Finally, the course explores how elections administrators can apply the aforementioned types of benchmarking to various elections administration issues.

  • Course XXIII:   Researching Election Administration

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    The election system is receiving greater scrutiny today than ever before. Researchers from a variety of organizations are studying many aspects of election administration, sometimes in isolation from other parts of the system. Their findings, which show up in academic journals, government reports, and popular press, can influence policy makers and public opinion. This course is a summary of methods and findings for election administrators. The goal is to help practitioners discern what is useful critique what is not and identify gaps that need to be filled.

  • Course XXIV:  Expanding The Franchise: Pathways To Participation And Professionalism

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    This course covers the development of contemporary American election administration from the historic moments of the 1960s to the present day. The course begins with the passage of the Civil Rights Act (1964) and Voting Rights Act (1965) and traces key legislation, court decisions, regulatory developments, and political events alongside the launching of new organizations and activities that have shaped the growing professionalism of election administration during this time. The course concludes with a discussion of current key developments in the states that present professional challenges. Professionalism of the field includes the launching of new organizations and activities, such as the Elections Administration Reports, the Election Assistance Commission, The Election Center, and others.

  • Course XXV:    Defining Democracy: Women’s Suffrage

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    In this course, students will examine women’s suffrage in the US and in a comparative perspective. Issues considered will be the place of women’s suffrage with respect to other suffrage efforts in the US; the woman’s suffrage movement and the factors that led to its success; the development of women’s suffrage in other countries; and the effects of women’s suffrage in the US.

  • Course XXVI:  Election Administration Resource Management: Increasing Revenue and Understanding True Costs

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    This course will explore election administration and voter registration resources for establishing the cost of elections and registration. It will explore tools for budget requests including office operating, capital, and equipment budgets. Is it better to purchase or lease? The course will also cover resource requests from the budget official’s perspective: What does it take to make the best case for more funding? What is the appropriate way to charge for elections and election services? Specific topics also include adding contractors vs. more staff, and the addition of new technology.

    Participants are encouraged to bring a copy of their office/election budget for use in discussion and exercises.

  • Course XXVII: Comparing Election Performance by Measuring Processes and Using Results

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    Measuring election performance is quickly becoming an important issue at the top of the national agenda. Policymakers and voters expect a voting experience that is efficient and accurate and yet “one size” voting procedures cannot fit all circumstances given the wide variation in systems, laws and practices across states and local election jurisdictions. At the same time, it is critical that election administrators be able to measure and analyze their performance and use their findings to demonstrate that elections are working well, to make changes when warranted, and to communicate information about elections to the election community, policymakers, voters and others.

    This course uses techniques of performance measurement and analysis to explore several critical elements of the election administration system at the center of conversation today, including voter registration, ballot processing, and voter processing. Participants will learn techniques of performance measurement and process analysis, and use these to analyze examples provided by member jurisdictions. Participants will also explore different avenues for communicating and using the results of performance measurement and process analysis. Participants are encouraged to bring examples from their own jurisdictions for discussion and analysis.

  • Course XXVIII: Navigating Successful Change Management in Election Administration

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    This course presents a structured process for managing successful organizational change in election administration and voter registration offices. As the public sector environment around elections continues to change rapidly, election administrators are faced with increasing demands for accountability and performance. Significant organizational change is both essential and inevitable in all public organizations, yet this sort of change is difficult in election offices because of a complex set of traditional structures, cultures, and routines than can inhibit organizational transformations. Participants will work with actual election administration management changes and design and evaluate change management plans. This approach builds capacity for smooth organizational change and successful implementation to maximize lasting benefits.

  • Course XXIX: Using Surveys, Focus Groups, and Polling to Collect Information to Help Election Professionals

    1 & ½ days, 10 hours of instruction

    How does the public view your office? How do you know? This course teaches participants how to understand several common method of interpreting election activity. As we would expect, reports for Election 2016 are full of polling data and the opinions of voters and candidates. These reports influence public opinion about election results and about election operations. Elections professionals everywhere need to understand the strengths and weakness of these methods, especially when they may be asked by the press of county commissioners, for example, to comment on results. This course examines how surveys, focus groups, and polling are conducted. Participants will gain experience in reading questions and interpreting the results, and in understanding the benefits and weaknesses of various types of approaches. Participants are encouraged to bring examples from their own jurisdictions for discussions and analysis.

 

 

CONTACT US

21946 Royal Montreal, Suite 100

Katy, TX 77450

281-396-4309 Phone

281-396-4315 Fax

services@electioncenter.org

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The Election Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting, preserving, and improving democracy. Its members are government employees whose profession is to serve in voter registration and elections administration.

 

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